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b de la cruz

skunkbear:

The Blind Woman Who Saw Rain

Posting our new video again for the late crowd: A story of love, loss and neuroscience.

drewvigal:

It’s like getting the band back together: @bendelacruz & @travisfox

drewvigal:

It’s like getting the band back together: @bendelacruz & @travisfox

newsweek:

Cross-medium artist Shelley Jackson is mixing Instagram and interminable snowfall to tell a long, beautiful story, end to beginning. You can read (and remix) her work here

skunkbear:

These are some #wolffacts compiled by Becky Lettenberger — one of the rock stars behind NPR’s in-depth, beautiful look at the human/wolf conflict/confluence in Montana.

skunkbear:

These are some #wolffacts compiled by Becky Lettenberger — one of the rock stars behind NPR’s in-depth, beautiful look at the human/wolf conflict/confluence in Montana.

skunkbear:

Bone-eating worms have been munching on the skeletons of dead whales (and most likely the ancestors of whales) for tens of millions of years. But they were only discovered back in 2012.  Robert Vrijenhoek was exploring the floor of Monterey Bay in a submarine when he came upon a whale carcass:

"One of the first things we noticed during that first dive were large white mats of bacteria that were decomposing tissue and other parts of the carcass. A little octopus had taken up residence in a ‘cave’ created by the hole in the back of the whale’s skull. Below the octopus’ lair was a pile of crab legs and other crab parts. He was having a great time picking off the bright red lithodid crabs that were crawling all over the carcass, bringing the crabs back to his home, and dropping the debris on his doorstep. So this dead whale had become a little self-contained ecosystem, complete with predators, decomposers, and bacteria."

"But the other thing we noticed was the proliferation of these little red worm-like creatures. They were all over the bones. They were growing like crazy, carpeting the remaining whale bones. The worms had short trunks topped by red plumes, and were about an inch or two in height. There were thousands of them waving in the current. It was really fascinating to watch."

A few of these worm species have been described now, all under the genus “Osedax” (which means bone-eater). They’re part of the final chapter in the after life of a whale — gathering up the last remaining nutrients and reducing the skeleton to dust.

(via npr)

skunkbear:




Hair straightener, by Amber Kates
That hair isn’t on fire. And the hair straightener isn’t smoking. We’re actually seeing changes in air density caused by the rising heat. Our eyes wouldn’t pick up on any of this. We would just see clear air — in other words, nothing.
Here are a few more images like it — all created by Rochester Institute of Technology students for a science photography assignment, and all showing patterns of air flow.

Candle, by Andrew Kempchinskey / Lighter, Shaun McConnaghy

Burning hand sanitizer, by Nick Neumann / Marshmallow, by Benjamin Davis
These last two visualize flow that isn’t caused by heat:

Golf ball, by Joseph DeMartino / Soda, by Jena Pedersen
Here’s how these images were made:

The technique has a fancy, partly-German name: Schlieren Flow Visualization. It can be used reveal any change in air density.  Engineers use it to test the aerodynamics of different vehicles, like this YT-1300 light freighter:

Michael Hargather
Looking at these videos got me thinking: Sound is just a moving compression wave. It creates areas of more dense air and less dense air.  Could I use this technique to SEE sound?
Stay tuned for the answer!

skunkbear:

Hair straightener, by Amber Kates

That hair isn’t on fire. And the hair straightener isn’t smoking. We’re actually seeing changes in air density caused by the rising heat. Our eyes wouldn’t pick up on any of this. We would just see clear air — in other words, nothing.

Here are a few more images like it — all created by Rochester Institute of Technology students for a science photography assignment, and all showing patterns of air flow.

imageimage

Candle, by Andrew Kempchinskey / Lighter, Shaun McConnaghy

imageimage

Burning hand sanitizer, by Nick Neumann / Marshmallow, by Benjamin Davis

These last two visualize flow that isn’t caused by heat:

imageimage

Golf ball, by Joseph DeMartino / Soda, by Jena Pedersen

Here’s how these images were made:

The technique has a fancy, partly-German name: Schlieren Flow Visualization. It can be used reveal any change in air density.  Engineers use it to test the aerodynamics of different vehicles, like this YT-1300 light freighter:

Millenium Falcon

Michael Hargather

Looking at these videos got me thinking: Sound is just a moving compression wave. It creates areas of more dense air and less dense air.  Could I use this technique to SEE sound?

Stay tuned for the answer!

aspworldtour:

Nature’s best surfers
Photo | ASP

aspworldtour:

Nature’s best surfers

Photo | ASP

likeafieldmouse:

J. S. Bach - Goldberg Variations, BWV 988 - Glenn Gould, 1981 studio performance

Without music, life would be a mistake. Friedrich Nietzsche

one of my faves!

nprradiopictures:

These days, getting an aerial shot is as simple (although maybe illegal) as strapping a camera to a drone. Back in the day, though, it wasn’t so easy.

George R. Lawrence, a commercial photographer at the turn of the last century, was known to tinker. (His Chicago studio advertised “The hitherto impossible in photography is our specialty.”) He was often hired to photograph conventions and banquet halls with a specialized panoramic camera he had built himself. In 1901, he had a loftier idea: to lift his panoramic camera off the ground. And not just a few feet — but hundreds.

Before Drone Cameras: Kite Cameras!

Photo Credit: George R. Lawrence/Library of Congress 

skunkbear:

Welcome to NPR’s brand spankin’ new science tumblr. Here, we’ll be sharing animations, explanatory videos, illustrations, science gifs, extras from radio stories, dispatches from the intersection of science and culture, home-made lava recipes, underwater operas, and fascinating graphs hastily scrawled on napkins. Some posts will come directly from NPR’s science coverage, some will come from the incredible bounty of the internet, and some, hopefully, will come from YOU.

A note about our (odd) name: Skunk bear is a nickname for the wolverine. It climbed to the top of the list of possible names with all the ferocious strength of the world’s largest terrestrial mustelid. Wolverines are known for their voracious appetites - they consume everything from voles to caribou.  And … here comes the connection … this tumblr is a place for you to consume a diverse feast of science stories, ideas and images.

- Adam

Dropping Science: Can rapping about science help minority students in New York City in the classroom. A Columbia University professor thinks so and has put together a city wide science rap battle to test his theory. Video by Adam Cole, Maggie Starbard and Ben de la Cruz / NPR.

Dropping Science: Can rapping about science help minority students in New York City in the classroom. A Columbia University professor thinks so and has put together a city wide science rap battle to test his theory. Video by Adam Cole, Maggie Starbard and Ben de la Cruz / NPR.

in honor of national poetry month

A haiku from the article: Dunes and Drama on a Drive Through Oman

in honor of national poetry month

A haiku from the article: Dunes and Drama on a Drive Through Oman

(Source: timeshaiku)